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20120901
20120930
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KQED (PBS) 35
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WMPT (PBS) 19
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 111 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the national debt. >> tom: and on capitol hill, new questions about the role of high frequency trading and u.s. markets. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: there was more evidence today of the struggling global economy. stocks around the globe sank on weak japanese trade figures, as well as a drop in chinese manufacturing activity for the eleventh straight month. the news here wasn't better. the conference board's index of leading economic indicators edged down a 0.1% in august, suggesting growth will stay sluggish in the second half. so, it's no surprise that the international monetary fund announced today it plans to cut its global growth forecast by a few decimal points when it releases its report next month. the i.m.f.'s currently forecast calls for growth of 3.5% this year, and 3.9% next. erika miller reports. >> reporter: global economic growth appears to be hitting a wall. a "bric" wall that is. there's growing evidence that economic growth is slowing in virtually every part of the globe, even the world's fastest growing economies. the term "bric" was coined a decade a
case today that the u.s. economy needs more stimulus and he's ready to give it another dose to boost growth. his message was clear and delivered with conviction. investors around the world had been waiting eagerly to hear the fed chairman's speech in jackson hole wyoming and stocks in the u.s. rallied in reaction. here are the highlights: bernanke said even though the economy has benefited from fed policies over the past few years. the outlook is still quote "far from satisfactory." he described the high unemployment rate a grave concern. he believes the fed should continue using non-traditional policies to spur growth. and bernanke concluded by saying the fed will provide additional policy accommodation as needed. >> tom: that statement was a buy signal for investors. they bought up stocks on the belief that the fed is on the verge of taking more action to stimulate the economy. blue chips rallied triple digits but pulled back by the close. the dow jumped 90 points. the nasdaq added 18 and the s&p rose seven. traders liked what they heard from the bernanke today. >> traders saw some
, to rising fees for a.t.m.'s and overdrafts, a new survey shows free checking is anything but. and apple sells five million iphone 5's over the weekend, but some expected more. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: u.s. investors began the week focused again on the global economy. the latest sign of worry: business confidence fell in germany for a fifth straight month in september. the international monetary fund today called on the international community to help finance the bailouts of euro- zone countries. that had u.s. markets following global markets lower. the dow fell 20 points, the nasdaq lost 19 and the s&p was down three. those worries in europe, are part of the reason the international monetary fund is shaving it's outlook for the global economy. the i.m.f.'s managing director says the trend has been clearly heading down. and, as darren gersh reports, she is calling on leaders in europe and the u.s. to change direction. >> reporter: the managing director of the i.m.f. has been described as the world's chief financial fire fighter. and today, christine lagarde urged policy
on auto exports, china fires back on unfair trade practices by the u.s. from stocks to oil and gold prices, we get the outlook for what to expect between now and the end of the year. and a birthday for "occupy wall street". while protests and arrests mark the movement's first anniversary, a look at what it's accomplished. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! trade tensions between the united states and china are heating up again. this morning, the two countries challenged each other in the world trade organization. the u.s. is accusing china of illegally subsidizing auto and auto parts exports, and hurting u.s. made goods. and china claims trade laws here, open the door for illegal tariffs on a wide range of chinese products. sylvia hall breaks down what's behind the latest flareup. >> reporter: here in the u.s., the auto and auto parts industries employ about 800,000 american workers. the government says those workers are hurt by the money china gives to subsidize its own auto industry. and in ohio, a key swing state fueled by cars, president obama promised a crack down: >> these are subsid
changer in the defense industry, two of europe's biggest players look to join forces, just as the u.s. defense industry prepares to slim down. >> susie: the latest census numbers are in, and a record 46 million people remain below the poverty line. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: thinner, faster, taller. we're talking about apple's hotly anticipated iphone 5. it was unveiled today in san francisco, and investors were impressed, juicing the shares up to $669 a share. but does the new device live up to the hype? erika miller takes a closer look at whether the new iphone will be fruitful for apple. >> reporter: this is the new device that could upset the apple cart in the smartphone industry. apple c.e.o. tim cook unveiled the iphone 5 in san francisco. and it has new features designed to fend off competition from rival android phones. >> it is an absolute jewel. it is the most beautiful product we have ever made bar none. >> reporter: now the nitty gritty: the phone is made entirely of glass and aluminum. so it's 18% thinner, and 20% lighter than the last version. i
help for the economy, coming in three days. the u.s. central bank holds a two-day policy meeting this week, ending thursday afternoon, perhaps by announcing more stimulus. stock investors today were tentative ahead of the meeting. the dow slipped 52 points. the nasdaq lost about 32 and the s&p 500 dipped nearly nine. we start with suzanne pratt looking at what options remain for the fed, and how investors might react to them. >> reporter: as has been the case frequently this year, all eyes here on wall street, have been looking south about 200 miles, to washington. what traders have been watching is what happens here at the federal reserve. and, this week is no different, more watching and waiting for more stimulus. it is widely anticipated fed policymakers will decide once again to step in and try help the economy. >> we're expecting another round of quantitative easing, q.e.3., they'll probably buy mainly u.s. treasury securities. at the same time, they'll probably extend the language on when they expect to be hiking rates from 2014 to 2015. but, even if the market gets more as
% of the s&p 500 index. thanks to apple's huge gain this year, the s&p is up 14%. on the other hand, the apple-less dow is up only 9%. and don't forget the tech-heavy nasdaq. apple accounts for 13% of the weighting in that index. thanks to the shine in apple shares, the nasdaq is up 19% this year. with apple's outsized influence on the market, a warm welcome for iphone 5 tomorrow might make more than apple shareholders happy. but some market pros say it's a stretch to think apple has kidnapped the stock market. >> i would not argue that, as apple goes, so goes the market. i think there's a lot of other sectors that we're also paying attention to. and granted, we've been overweight the technology sector, but we're also overweight things like materials and the consumer discretionary sectors. >> reporter: still, even wren concedes apple's effect on the market is more than mathematical; it's also emotional. which brings us back to the iphone 5, likely to get a good reception tomorrow from techies. but if history is any guide, investors might sell apple shares when the phone debuts. >> w
of economic numbers. manufacturing activity in the u.s. dropped for the third straight month. the institute of supply management's gauge of manufacturing slipped in august to 49.6, the lowest reading in two years. american factories have been a critical source of new jobs. a separate report showed that spending on construction projects in july dropped. that decline comes after three months of gains. all that discouraging news weighed on stocks. the dow lost 55 points, the nasdaq added eight, and the s&p fell by almost two points. >> tom: all this data on the economy comes as we begin what's traditionally the toughest month to be a shareholder. there's no shortage of uncertainty this september for investors-- the election in full-swing, europe and the approaching tax hikes and spending cuts. here's suzanne pratt. >> reporter: august on wall street can be downright dull, with little volume and few headlines. but history shows september can be trouble, particularly for stock investors. since 1929, the s&p 500 has lost an average of 1.2% in september, making it the worst month of the year for s
advertising the older 4-s version its store today. the company is also facing backlash against its new map app. the software replaces google maps and websites have already sprung up mocking apple's innacuracies. but that controversy didn't seem to hinder sales today. >> i'm pretty sure an update will clear everything up anyway. it's that simple. >> reporter: by midday, lines at many apple stores were already much shorter. but don't be fooled. this is expected to be the largest consumer electronics debut in history. by some estimates, apple could sell as many as 10 million iphones by monday morning. that would be twice what was sold the opening weekend for the last iphone model, the 4-s. for apple, a lot is riding on this launch. the iphone is its best-selling prodt. >> the iphone 5 drives approximately 70% of the profitability for apple. so this probably their most critical product launch out of all their product lines. and, to the extent that apple only comes out with a new iphone on an annual basis, clearly, this makes or breaks the year. >> reporter: apple shares didn't get much of a pop to
most actively traded exchange traded products were down. the s&p 500 volatility note was up 7.9%. it tends to move in an opposite direction than the index. and that's tonight's "market focus." >> tom: one gauge of economic activity is a simple wall socket. an economy that is humming along is powered by electricity, and much of that power comes from coal. we spoke with greg boyce, chairman and c.e.o. at coal miner peabody energy about the demand for coal and what that demand says about the global economy and his business. >> coal markets are heavily reliant on electricity demand, which is a surrogate for gdp, and for our met lurjical coal it's steal production. and with europe soft, and the u.s. not getting traction, and now china softening, we've already begun to slow down our production base. we may see more of that across the industry over the next quarter or so, and until we see economic activity getting back to where it used to be. >> do you keep one eye on the price of natural gas. how high to natural gas prices have to go. >> there's prices critical to us. our biggest pl
billions of dollars to buy bonds to rev up the u.s. economy and create more jobs. on wall street, investors applauded the move and stocks surged. as policymakers wrapped up a two-day meeting, they said they took this action because, without it, economic growth might not be strong enough to create jobs. but the fed's latest round of quantitative easing, what everyone calls q.e.-3, is different this time. the fed will buy mortgage backed securities rather than u.s. treasuries. it will buy $40 billion per month. more importantly, the fed said the buying is open-ended-- it promised to keep buying until the job market "improves substantially." and the fed pledged to keep interest rates "exceptionally low" through 2015. stocks rallied right after the fed announcement. the dow jumped 206 points, the nasadaq rose 41.5, and the s&p added 23 points. fed chairman ben bernanke described today's move as "a main street policy." darren gersh reports. >> if you are unemployed or worried about keeping your job, the federal reserve today had a clear message for you-- "we're here to help." federal reserve cha
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 111 (some duplicates have been removed)